Light > Darkness

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Time to close the curtains, turn of the lights and pretend your not in! Halloween is coming this weekend.

Like many Christians this time of year can fill me with dread. Especially if I have to be home alone. The blatant celebration of evil and darkness can be terrifying, so we do what we do best: hide away and pretend that nothing is happening.

We spend ages saying how terrible it is that shops are stocking aisles of Halloween related tat. “It’s getting bigger every year.” Then we go home, close the curtains and hide away. Because that’s what you do when you’re scared.

And it is shocking; only this week I read that Halloween is now the third biggest holiday in the UK, only beaten by Christmas and Easter. I’ve even heard of people decorating their houses like you would at Christmas. It can feel like darkness is taking over.

What do we do, do we run away and hide, scared of the darkness, or do we fight it with light.

It’s not even like it’s a real fight. Light will always beat darkness. Even on Halloween.

We do not need to be afraid.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. (John 1:5)

 

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8 thoughts on “Light > Darkness

  1. I consider Halloween a fun holiday when my kids get to use their imagination and dress up as a character they love! We don’t address the darkness of that meaning, because they are blind to it! Instead we focus on the fun and the candy and the community excitedly coming together. This year we took along a family new to the country, as it was their first ever trick or treating experience! The kids had a BLAST and it offered me the opportunity to reach out and help this family feel connected, when otherwise with their language barrier and not understanding the festivities- they would have felt isolated and afraid.

    I also bring in costumes to donate every year for the school parties… to those children who can’t afford a costume. It’s just another way to use the holiday to reach out to others, and do some intentional good!

    Maybe I’ve always felt called to BE the light- and I try every year to do just that. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My thoughts are similar to Chris’ on the issue.

    Did you know that every Christian holiday was actually scheduled that way in order to counter-act an already existing pagan holiday?

    I think it totally depends on how you raise your children and the thoughts you bring them up with. Although we don’t have kids yet, when we are home on Halloween, we dress up, hand out candy, decorate the house in fun colours. Our church puts on a ‘Family Spectacular’ festival for kids to come in costume and play and get candy.

    I feel like there are so many ways we can enjoy the fun part of Halloween while using it to show love and open our arms to others as Christ would.

    Just to share some alternate thoughts on the issue 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks for your thoughts, there seems to be a split in opinion across the Atlantic! Churches in the UK hold light parties to counteract the darkness. And give out Christian gifts to anyone who may knock on their door. When I have children I wouldn’t want them celebrating Halloween , I think it can be confusing for people watching us as Christians if they see as joining in something so dark. Over people may not know where where to draw the line, (like where Paul talks about eating food dedicated to false gods: avoid do anything which may cause your brother or sister to stumble)so think it’s best to avoid all things in any way associated with paganism and witch craft.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. According to the encyclopaedias, All Hallows’ Eve was a time for remembering those who have died in Christ. A Christian celebratory alternative which also honours those we knew who have gone on before us would be a wonderful experience for our kids, at the same time keeping them in the loop of birth to death experience that our wider society shuns and fears. And following it the next day with remembering Christians now alive would double that.

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